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About Big Berkey Water Filters

Top 3 ways a Berkey Water Filter will benefit your life

Drink To Your Health

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Berkey water filter systems are far superior to other filtration systems because they remove harmful pathogenic bacteria, cysts, parasites, and unhealthy chemical contaminants such as Chlorine to levels higher than 99.99%, while at the same time leaving in the essential minerals your body needs.
Did you know that over 60% of US municipal water is fluoridated? Berkey water filter systems also distinguish themselves from many other filtration systems by having the capabilities to significantly reduce fluoride and arsenic via the "PF" line of filters.

Affordability

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Each durable Black Berkey Water filter will last up to 3000 gallons (6000 gallons per set of 2). This is much longer than the majority of water filter solutions on the market.
At 10 gallons per week, this equates to more than 11.5 years of healthy clean drinking water!
Including fluoride and arsenic reduction, 1 gallon of Berkey water costs just 7 cents!.
Stop and think how much money you could save by the simple reduction in bottled water purchases by regularly using water filtered by your Berkey water filter.

Versatility

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Berkey Water Filter systems are capable of purifying both treated water (municipal/city water) and untreated raw water from such sources as remote lakes, streams, stagnant ponds, and water supplies in foreign countries.
The micro-pores within the self-sterilizing and re-cleanable Black Berkey water filter purification elements are so small that pathogenic bacteria are simply not able to pass through them.
Due to the fact that the Berkey water filters do not require electricity and are portable, they become a lifesaver during times of flooding, loss of electricity, and other life threatening emergencies.

A message to our visitors

At BigBerkeyWaterFilters.com, we understand that choosing the right water filter for you and your family can be a daunting task. Made in the USA, Berkey Water Filters are the gold standard of gravity filtration, thanks to their long established reputation in the industry combined with their outstanding filtration test results. Please don`t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions about Berkey filtration, would like to learn more about our deals for bulk Berkey water filter purchases, or our discounts for charity organizations and missionaries.

Thanks, Dan DeBaun - Owner

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    • Effect of Road Salt Additives and Alternatives on Aquatic Ecosystems

      A recent study by researchers from the Jefferson Project at Lake George looks at the ecological impacts of additives commonly added to road salt, as well as commonly used alternatives to road salt. The Jefferson Project is a collaboration between several organizations, which was initiated in the hopes of developing an technologically advanced environmental monitoring and prediction system that would help managers to better understand and conserve the Lake George aquatic ecosystem, and which could also be applied to other freshwater systems all over the world. Road salt additives and alternatives that are commonly used in or to replace sodium chloride — the most widely used type of road salt — are typically marketed as eco-friendly, low-salt alternatives to the most common form of road salt used to keep roads ice-free. But, it turns out that these additives and alternatives may not be so environmentally friendly after all. According to Rich Relyea, the director of the Jefferson Project at Lake George: "Additives and alternative salts are presumed to be less environmentally harmful because they let us use less sodium chloride, but what about the potential impact of the additives and salt alternatives themselves? We know almost nothing about the impact of these additives and alternatives on aquatic ecosystems," he says. According to the study, which was recently published in the Journal of Applied Ecology, organic additives routinely added to road salt alternatives — for example additives included in commercial road salt products such as Magic Salt and GeoMelt — serve as a fertilizer to freshwater systems, promoting algal growth and allowing algae eating organisms to thrive. While the road salt alternative, magnesium chloride, which is used in commercial road salt products such as Clear Lane, has been found to boost populations of tiny aquatic crustaceans that forage on algae, and which play an important role in food webs, supporting fish. Relyea and his colleagues undertook several experiments to determine the impact that various types of road salt had on aquatic food chains, and their results were quite surprising. Research published earlier this year showed how a common zooplankton species is able to genetically evolve within a time frame of just 6 weeks to be able to tolerate moderate concentrations of sodium chloride in water. While research published towards the end of last year revealed that sodium chloride is able to change sex ratios in developing frog populations. Further research has been conducted on the impacts of various types of road salt on juvenile trout living in streams and wetlands. In this latest research — a pioneering study comparing the impacts of road salt additives and alternatives on aquatic ecosystem — scientists outfitted 64 replicate aquatic ecosystems with key players in aquatic food webs, including phytoplankton, zooplankton, tiny crustaceans and snails. The team prepared five road salt "treatments": • Rock salt (sodium chloride) • Magnesium chloride • Sodium chloride with low levels of magnesium chloride added (similar to that found in the commercial road salt product Clear Lane®) • Sodium chloride combined with beet juice (similar to that found in GeoMelt®) • Magnesium chloride combined with a byproduct of the distillation process (similar to that found in Magic Salt). They then applied each of these treatments at three different concentrations commonly found in freshwater systems: 50, 100, 200 milligrams/liter of chloride, while using tap water containing 25 milligrams/liter of chloride as a benchmark control. After one month, they looked at the changes in these replicated ecosystems. According to the study, "microbes digested some of the sugars in the beet juice and distillation byproducts, causing an immediate drop in dissolved oxygen levels." Microbes are also likely to have transformed an unusable form of phosphorus in the additives to a form that is more readily available for algae to use, thus boosting algal growth. The authors found that these algal blooms allowed zooplankton populations to triple in size, which in a natural aquatic ecosystem could allow fish and other predators of zooplankton to increase in both size and numbers. "Organic additives are like adding food to the lake. They are broken down into nutrients and organisms eat them," said Matthew Schuler, a postdoctoral research associate and first author of the paper. "The additives in GeoMelt and Magic Salt act as a fertilizer for aquatic systems." Low levels of magnesium chloride similar to those used in Magic Salt, Clear Lane and in the magnesium chloride treatments caused aquatic amphipod populations to more than triple in number. "Our research shows that these chemicals can cause changes to the food web, but we can't tell you whether that is desirable or not," Relyea said. "More algae means more zooplankton and more fish, and the angler might like that. But more algae also means turbid water, and a homeowner may not like that. It's a subjective public question." Journal Reference Schuler, M. S., Hintz, W. D., Jones, D. K., Lind, L. A., Mattes, B. M., Stoler, A. B., Sudol, K. A. and Relyea, R. A. (2017), How common road salts and organic additives alter freshwater food webs: in search of safer alternatives. J Appl Ecol. doi:10.1111/1365-2664.12877

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    • Effect of Road Salt Additives and Alternatives on Aquatic Ecosystems
    • Methane in the Groundwater of Hood and Parker Counties Linked to Natural Sources

      A team of researchers from The University of Texas at Austin have indicated that high concentrations of methane found in drinking water wells at two counties located near Fort Worth are likely to originate from shallow naturally occurring gas deposits rather than gas leaks due to fracking operations in the deeper Barnett Shale. In a report that was recently published in the scientific journal Groundwater, the scientists build on earlier studies related to the quality of well water in the Barnett Shale, using chemical as well as geographic evidence to link the elevated methane levels of certain wells to naturally occurring shallow deposits. Natural gas consists primarily of methane gas, and is found in large deposits in shale rock formations deep underground. However, smaller deposits of methane can also be found much shallower, typically just a few hundred feet below the surface. These shallower deposits —such as the one found in this geological formation known as the Strawn Group— form as methane gas from deeper deposits moves upwards towards the surface. "Over geologic time, methane has accumulated into these shallower reservoirs," explains Jean‐Philippe Nicot, a research scientist at the Bureau of Economic Geology, a unit of the UT Jackson School of Geosciences. "These fresh-water wells are very close to these shallower reservoirs and may be the source of the methane." With around 20,000 gas wells or more, the Barnett Shale formation underlying Fort Worth is one of America's largest and highly productive gas fields. But the boom in natural gas production and fracking operations has also been linked to potentially hazardous methane levels in drinking water wells, particularly in Silverado, a neighborhood located in Parker County, just outside Fort Worth. Distribution of dissolved methane across the Barnett Shale play. Each small red dot represents a Barnett Shale gas well. The other colored dots represent groundwater sample locations.The map includes 18,022 gas wells and 457 sample locations, with some overlapping at this scale. The key in the bottom right shows the concentration of methane, if any, found in each water sample. The black square surrounds a high-methane area where researchers conducted in-depth analysis of groundwater samples. The scientists sampled over 450 water wells from 12 counties located in the Barnett Shale to determine the extent and source of methane contamination of wells. They found that the groundwater supplying 85% of the wells had very low levels of methane (10 milligrams per liter of water), levels which are considered potentially dangerous due to the flammable nature of methane gas. In order to determine where the methane originated from, the scientists decided to examine the cluster a little closer, analyzing water samples from 58 wells, working from the center of the cluster (where Silverado residential area is located) outwards until methane was not detected in well water. "What we wanted to do was understand how much methane there is and determine the size of the high methane hotspot," Nicot said. Methane gas is produced in one of two ways: 1) thermogenically, when organic material is broken down in an environment that has a high temperature and high pressure, typically at great depths, although this methane can migrate upwards over time; or 2) biogenically, as a result of methane-forming microbial activity, which typically occurs at shallow depths. To determine whether the methane was from biogenic or thermogenic sources, as well as the depth the contamination originated from, the scientists used carbon isotope analysis combined with additional analysis. "Combining alkane, noble gas and nitrogen compositions and isotope ratios allowed us to distinguish natural gas sourced from the deep Barnett Shale from the shallow Strawn Group," explained Toti Larson, a researcher at the Jackson School's Department of Geological Sciences. While these findings suggest methane found in water wells of Hood and Parker counties most likely originates from the Strawn Group, the scientists point out that they cannot completely rule out the possibility that some of this methane may have originated from gas leaks that occurred during fracking operations. Journal Reference Jean‐Philippe Nicot, Patrick Mickler, Toti Larson, M. Clara Castro, Roxana Darvari, Kristine Uhlman, Ruth Costley. Methane Occurrences in Aquifers Overlying the Barnett Shale Play with a Focus on Parker County, Texas. Groundwater (March, 2017). DOI: 10.1111/gwat.12508

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    • Methane in the Groundwater of Hood and Parker Counties Linked to Natural Sources
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  • "Customer service in the USA is a dream! It's been a pleasure shopping with you."
    -Jeltje Gordon Lennox - Geneva, Switzerland
  • "The Big Berkey is such a blessing. We have owned ours now for almost a year and don't know how we did without it. "
    -Amber - Dallas, Texas
  • "The folks at berkey have been nothing but great in helping me purchase my Berkey and then answering some questions once got it"
    -Sandy Schmidt - Edison, New Jersey
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