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About Big Berkey Water Filters

Top 3 ways a Berkey Water Filter will benefit your life

Drink To Your Health

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Berkey water filter systems are far superior to other filtration systems because they remove harmful pathogenic bacteria, cysts, parasites, and unhealthy chemical contaminants such as Chlorine to levels higher than 99.99%, while at the same time leaving in the essential minerals your body needs.
Did you know that over 60% of US municipal water is fluoridated? Berkey water filter systems also distinguish themselves from many other filtration systems by having the capabilities to significantly reduce fluoride and arsenic via the "PF" line of filters.

Affordability

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Each durable Black Berkey Water filter will last up to 3000 gallons (6000 gallons per set of 2). This is much longer than the majority of water filter solutions on the market.
At 10 gallons per week, this equates to more than 11.5 years of healthy clean drinking water!
Including fluoride and arsenic reduction, 1 gallon of Berkey water costs just 7 cents!.
Stop and think how much money you could save by the simple reduction in bottled water purchases by regularly using water filtered by your Berkey water filter.

Versatility

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Berkey Water Filter systems are capable of purifying both treated water (municipal/city water) and untreated raw water from such sources as remote lakes, streams, stagnant ponds, and water supplies in foreign countries.
The micro-pores within the self-sterilizing and re-cleanable Black Berkey water filter purification elements are so small that pathogenic bacteria are simply not able to pass through them.
Due to the fact that the Berkey water filters do not require electricity and are portable, they become a lifesaver during times of flooding, loss of electricity, and other life threatening emergencies.

A message to our visitors

At BigBerkeyWaterFilters.com, we understand that choosing the right water filter for you and your family can be a daunting task. Made in the USA, Berkey Water Filters are the gold standard of gravity filtration, thanks to their long established reputation in the industry combined with their outstanding filtration test results. Please don`t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions about Berkey filtration, would like to learn more about our deals for bulk Berkey water filter purchases, or our discounts for charity organizations and missionaries.

Thanks, Dan DeBaun - Owner

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    • Getting the Balance Right: Managing Watershed Quality to Prevent Coastal Dead Zones

      Nitrate-rich agricultural runoff is considered one of the key factors contributing to harmful algal blooms in coastal zones. The Gulf of Mexico is particularly vulnerable to harmful algal blooms for two reasons: 1) It is a large bay with slow water turnover rates, exacerbated by strong onshore winds; and 2) Many of the watersheds feeding into it flow through agricultural lands. Now a new study, which was recently published in the scientific journal Ecology Letters, examines the link between agricultural runoff and harmful algal blooms in the Gulf of Mexico, The study looks at how the silica:inorganic-nitrogen ratio in the water of 130 lakes that feed into the Gulf of Mexico influence nutrient levels in these coastal waters. Satellite Image of Gulf of Mexico Algae Blooms The study is important, especially considering that during 2016 the Gulf experienced an above average sized dead zone as a result of a combination of agriculture, algae and weather patterns. Long-term records of water chemistry in the Gulf of Mexico show that the silica:inorganic-nitrogen ratio has changed dramatically over the last century, shifting more towards nitrogen. There are two potential explanations for this shift: 1) silica may be removed by reservoirs and dams dotted along the watershed; and 2) the input of nitrogen (from nitrate-rich fertilizers) from agricultural runoff is so high that it forces the ratio of silica:nitrogen downward. This new study shows that silica is not removed by dams and reservoirs, and that nitrogen levels increase dramatically when agriculture makes up more than 60% of the landscapes feeding into the system. In coastal zones, such as the Lake Erie and the Gulf of Mexico, high concentrations of dissolved nitrogen fuel algal growth, which leads to oxygen depletion, or coastal dead zones. In normal conditions, where the ratio of silica:nitrogen is in balance, diatoms — which are effectively the lungs of the planet — are able to survive. Yet, when the chemical balance is tipped towards nitrogen, the phytoplankton community is altered. Diatoms — beneficial algae that we want to see in the Gulf of Mexico — thrive when the levels of silica and nitrogen are in balance. When conditions tend to be more nitrate-rich, other more harmful species of phytoplankton thrive. The research team found that an increase in nitrogen runoff from agricultural fields explains why the Gulf of Mexico is continually plagued by harmful algal blooms. The scientists also identified ways in which landscapes could be better managed to improve water quality in the watersheds and coastal zones they feed into. They recommend that landscapes be managed at watershed level to significantly enhance water quality, particularly during wet years. They also suggest that reservoirs and dams could be key areas to target to diminish nutrient loads without impacting silica concentrations of water flowing into the Gulf of Mexico. "We need to be vigilant about our land use and water quality," said co-author John Downing, director of the University of Minnesota Sea Grant College Program and the study's principal investigator. "Climate change and increased storminess will likely exacerbate the skewed ratios we found and the extent of harmful blooms in coastal areas if we don't manage agricultural runoff more effectively. Harmful algae blooms cost the U.S. seafood, tourism and health industries over $80 million a year according the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and we know we can do better." Journal Reference John A. Downing et al, Low ratios of silica to dissolved nitrogen supplied to rivers arise from agriculture not reservoirs, Ecology Letters (2016). DOI: 10.1111/ele.12689

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    • Getting the Balance Right: Managing Watershed Quality to Prevent Coastal Dead Zones
    • Investing in Water Quality

      Public would rather put money behind funding green infrastructure than gray infrastructure for protecting drinking water sources The recent Flint water crisis has driven home the importance of protecting drinking water and the need for investing in and maintaining water infrastructure. Yet policy-makers often find it difficult making decisions on where to invest financial resources and how to gain public approval for spending tax payers money in their efforts to protect drinking water sources. Now, a recent study undertaken by researchers at the University of Delaware shows that if given a choice, people would rather see money invested in protecting and conserving water resources with green infrastructure, than money being channeled into gray infrastructure such as water treatment facilities. The study, which was published in the scientific journal Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, also found that people's eagerness to contribute to water projects were affected to a large extent by different messages related to global warming, climate change, extreme weather events or decaying water infrastructure.6 "People are much more willing to pay for conservation," said Kent Messer, director of the Center for Experimental and Applied Economics (CEAE) in the University's College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR), and co-author of the paper. "They like the idea of permanently protecting the waters from their source and avoiding having to do technological fixes." The study used a field experiment that involved 251 adults from various sites around northern Delaware, including the New Castle Country Farmers Market, University of Delaware's Ag Day, as well as community members from Southbridge, Wilmington. The participants had to perform one simple task, for which they were financially compensated. They then had the option of donating those funds to one of two organizations that could address water quality issues: 1) the Conservation Fund, which funds green infrastructure projects such as construction of bioswales and other green storm water management options; or 2) the American Water Works Associations (AWWA), which funds gray infrastructure projects. The participants leaned heavily towards contributing towards green infrastructure projects. "People didn't just show up and automatically receive money. They earned their money. Then, we asked if they wanted to donate it to either a conservation cause (green infrastructure) or to help drinking water utilities (gray infrastructure)," said Messer. The researchers also assessed how different messages influenced the choices the participants made. The results of their survey suggest that people are more likely to contribute when message topics focused on global warming or climate change rather than when messages focused on extreme weather events. Consequently, when formulating a message to encourage citizens to help protect water resources, policy-makers need to choose their message topics carefully. According to Messer, policy-makers often debate whether it is wise to discuss climate change or whether this topic is best avoided, focusing on extreme weather instead. Yet this study suggests that may be the wrong approach. "This research suggests the emphasis on large storms like Hurricane Sandy will actually make people less willing to take action as it appears that people perceive these large storms as being out of human control," said Messer. "If it's just decaying infrastructure, normal storms, or even climate change, then people might feel they can do something about it. But when you start really emphasizing these large magnitude storms, there becomes a sense of hopelessness." Journal Reference Sean F Ellis, Jacob R Fooks Kent, D Messer and Matthew J Miller. The Effects of Climate Change Information on Charitable Giving for Water Quality Protection: A Field Experiment. Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Volume 45, Issue 2 (Economics of Water Quality), August 2016, pp. 319-337, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/age.2016.17

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    • Investing in Water Quality
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  • "Customer service in the USA is a dream! It's been a pleasure shopping with you."
    -Jeltje Gordon Lennox - Geneva, Switzerland
  • "The Big Berkey is such a blessing. We have owned ours now for almost a year and don't know how we did without it. "
    -Amber - Dallas, Texas
  • "The folks at berkey have been nothing but great in helping me purchase my Berkey and then answering some questions once got it"
    -Sandy Schmidt - Edison, New Jersey
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