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About Big Berkey Water Filters

Top 3 ways a Berkey Water Filter will benefit your life

Drink To Your Health. Berkey water filter systems are far superior to other filtration systems because they remove harmful pathogenic bacteria, cysts, parasites, and unhealthy chemical contaminants such as Chlorine to levels higher than 99.99%, while at the same time leaving in the essential minerals your body needs.
Did you know that over 60% of US municipal water is fluoridated? Berkey water filter systems also distinguish themselves from many other filtration systems by having the capabilities to significantly reduce fluoride and arsenic via the "PF" line of filters.

Affordability. Each durable Black Berkey Water filter will last up to 3000 gallons (6000 gallons per set of 2). This is much longer than the majority of water filter solutions on the market.
At 10 gallons per week, this equates to more than 11.5 years of healthy clean drinking water!
Including fluoride and arsenic reduction, 1 gallon of Berkey water costs just 7 cents!.
Stop and think how much money you could save by the simple reduction in bottled water purchases by regularly using water filtered by your Berkey water filter.

Versatility. Berkey Water Filter systems are capable of purifying both treated water (municipal/city water) and untreated raw water from such sources as remote lakes, streams, stagnant ponds, and water supplies in foreign countries.
The micro-pores within the self-sterilizing and re-cleanable Black Berkey water filter purification elements are so small that pathogenic bacteria are simply not able to pass through them.
Due to the fact that the Berkey water filters do not require electricity and are portable, they become a lifesaver during times of flooding, loss of electricity, and other life threatening emergencies.

A letter to our visitors

At BigBerkeyWaterFilters.com, we understand that choosing the right water filter for you and your family can be a daunting task. Made in the USA, Berkey Water Filters are the gold standard of gravity filtration, thanks to their long established reputation in the industry combined with their outstanding filtration test results. Please don`t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions about Berkey filtration, would like to learn more about our deals for bulk Berkey water filter purchases, or our discounts for charity organizations and missionaries.

Thanks, Dan DeBaun - Owner

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Latest posts

    • Wastewater from Oil and Gas Operations not Ideal for Suppressing Dust on Roads

      Thirteen US states allow wastewater from oil and gas operations to be applied to roads as a dust suppressant or deicing mechanism. However, a study that was recently published in Environmental Science & Technology suggests that using oil and gas wastewater as a dust suppressant is far from ideal and that there is a need for a safer, non-toxic yet affordable alternative. The researchers assessed state regulations pertaining to the use of wastewater for deicing and dust suppression and found that thirteen states permitted its use for this purpose, while four others could allow it to be spread on road surfaces under regulations related to land spreading.The oil and gas wastewater used for deicing and dust suppression on roads originates from conventional vertically drilled oil and gas wells as apposed to fracking fluids used in the hydraulic fracturing oil extraction process."Oil and gas wastewaters are known to have high salt, organic and radioactivity concentrations," said lead author, Travis Tasker, a graduate student in environmental engineering at Penn State. "When we found out that this wastewater was being spread on roads, we wanted to evaluate its potential to cause biological toxicity and accumulate in road material or migrate into water resources." Oil and gas wastewater is loaded with salt, containing high levels of sodium, magnesium, calcium and strontium, which make it effective at suppressing dust and deicing roads. It also contains other toxic contaminants — such as radium, a known carcinogen — that can be harmful to the environment and/or human health, especially in large concentrations. "We would like to do experiments to test how effective the wastewaters are at suppressing dust in comparison to other commercial products," said Nathaniel Warner, assistant professor of environmental engineering, Penn State. "If the salts in the wastewaters are just as effective, then new regulations or additional treatment prior to spreading could help reduce the concentration of other contaminants of concern that exist in wastewaters, but not in commercial products." The research team sampled wastewater spread on roads in towns in Pennsylvania and then did laboratory simulations to determine where the pollutants in the wastewater would end up. The lab experiments showed that while rain washed salts off the road surface, some heavy metals such as lead did not wash away but rather remained behind, And in the case of radium, some of it is washed away during rain events, but some remained on the road surface.Radium, heavy metals and organic materials are all contaminants that could potentially pollute surface water and groundwater systems, and ultimately drinking water supplies. Salt is also a drinking water contaminant when it occurs at high concentrations. Yet while conventional methods used to treat wastewater can remove a number of these contaminants, it cannot reduce the level of salt. The researchers recommend that if wastewater is used as a deicing or dust suppressing agent on roadways it should at least be treated to remove radium and organic materials before it is applied to road surfaces. However, they would prefer to see alternative cost-effective alternatives being developed to replace wastewater use on roads, as the alternatives currently available are too costly for many municipalities to afford, meaning they either have to use oil and gas wastewater to treat roads or not treat the roads at all. Journal Reference T. L. Tasker, W. D. Burgos, P. Piotrowski, L. Castillo-Meza, T. A. Blewett, K. B. Ganow, A. Stallworth, P. L. M. Delompré, G. G. Goss, L. B. Fowler, J. P. Vanden Heuvel, F. Dorman, N. R. Warner. Environmental and Human Health Impacts of Spreading Oil and Gas Wastewater on Roads. Environmental Science & Technology, 2018; DOI: 10.1021/acs.est.8b00716

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    • Wastewater from Oil and Gas Operations not Ideal for Suppressing Dust on Roads
    • Cheaper to Remove Rather than Repair Dams, Study Finds

      A study that was recently conducted by researchers from Portland State University has found that removing aging dams across the country instead of repairing them could save billions of dollars, but cautions that more research is needed surrounding the factors that are driving efforts to remove dams across the country. The study, which was recently published online in the scientific journal River Research and Applications, assessed currently available nation-wide data on dams and compared characteristics and trends of dams which have been demolished to those which have been left standing. div align="center"> If the current trend in dam demolition continues, the researchers estimate that anywhere between 4,000 - 36,000 dams will have been demolished by 2050. According to the study, the maximum cost of demolishing 36,000 dams is estimated to be around US$25.1 billion, which is significantly cheaper than the estimated cost of repairing these dams. According to estimates proposed by The American Society of Civil Engineers, it will cost more than US$45 billion to upgrade and repair around 2,170 dams considered high-risk to life and property should they fail. However, the cost of rehabilitating all the derelict dams in the US to bring them up to a condition deemed safe is higher still, estimated to be around US$64 billion. "I think it's time for a re-invigorated public process around managing the risks dams and aging dam infrastructure pose to public safety throughout the U.S.," said Zbigniew Grabowski, a Ph.D. candidate in PSU College of Liberal Arts and Science's Earth, Environment & Society program and lead author author of the study. "It's difficult to assess the actual public safety hazards and the most cost-effective ways of mitigating those hazards because the data on dams and dam removals has not been systematically compiled in a way that allows for robust analysis by government agencies or independent researchers." The researchers found that a disproportionately higher number of hydropower and water-supply dams were removed, suggesting more discussion is needed over the factors that drive dam removal.According to Grabowski, the decision to remove or rehabilitate a dam often hinges on cost-benefit tradeoffs between the environmental, social and economic impact of the dam in question. But, he says that we should also focus on public safety when making these decisions, as from a safety perspective it simply may not make sense to repair many of these dams. The study suggests several recommendations to improve the decision-making process, including: 1.  Data collection methods used to track records of dams that are rehabilitated or removed need to be standardized and made available to the public to allow researchers to undertake more effective comparative research and for decision-makers at local, state and national levels to be able to make more informed management decisions. 2.  Researchers and officials responsible for dam policy need to look at the broader picture when making decisions regarding the future of dams by taking a multi-disciplinary approach that draws knowledge from disciplines such as ecological restoration, dam safety engineering, technology and social science, while also considering communities that are affected by the presence or removal of dams. Journal Reference 1. Zbigniew J. Grabowski, Heejun Chang, Elise L. Granek. Fracturing dams, fractured data: Empirical trends and characteristics of existing and removed dams in the United States. River Research and Applications, 2018; DOI: 10.1002/rra.3283

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    • Cheaper to Remove Rather than Repair Dams, Study Finds
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customer testimonials

  • Customer service in the USA is a dream! It's been a pleasure shopping with you.
    Jeltje Gordon Lennox Geneva, Switzerland
  • The Big Berkey is such a blessing. We have owned ours now for almost a year and don't know how we did without it.
    Amber Dallas, Texas
  • The folks at berkey have been nothing but great in helping me purchase my Berkey and then answering some questions once got it
    Sandy Schmidt Edison, New Jersey

Enjoy Purified Water For A Low Cost Using A Berkey Water Filter

Over the past 20 years, Berkey water has become a household name in water filtration systems across America. In part, this is because a Berkey filter has been proven time and again to filter more contaminants with greater effectiveness than most other products on the market. However, a general shift in consumer habits has also made home filtration more common than ever.

Let’s take a look at what is driving those changes, and then consider what leads consumers to choose a Big Berkey water filter over some other popular filter brands.

Everyone Loves Water

Do you know anyone who doesn’t enjoy drinking water? We’re sure they exist, but they’re few and far in between. Water constitutes over 60 percent of the human body and is essential for all bodily functions. If you look up the definition of water, here’s what it says:

Water – Noun – A colorless, transparent, flavorless, odorless liquid which forms the seas, lakes, rivers, and rain; and is the basis of the fluids of living organisms.

The words “flavorless” and “odorless” are key here. Water is life, and most agree that it actually doesn’t taste like much of anything. So what’s not to like?

When people complain about the taste of water, they are typically referring to the chemicals that have been added to make it safe to drink. These are chemicals such as chlorine, chloramines, and fluoride (which is actually tasteless). This is the water that comes direct from your kitchen faucet prior to being run through a home water filter.

Declining Confidence In Municipal Supplies

An infrastructure that delivers safe drinking water to every home is one of the basic prerequisites of a civilized society. It’s something that’s existed in America for over 100 years in some cities.

But when you consider that there are approximately 1.2 million miles of underground water pipes in the US, it is inevitable that there will eventually be leaks, breaks, and contamination issues. After all, that is enough to run five pipelines from the earth to the moon!

The majority of this infrastructure was put in place in the 1940s, and this a big part of the problem. Prior to 1948, water supply was a state-run affair, and water treatment processes were haphazard. Fortunately, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act of 1948 was enacted, and resulted in a vast improvement in the quality and safety of water in our country and in what was being delivered to our homes.

Even 70 years later, our society has continued to make improvements. We have a water supply that is regulated and mostly safe, with the exception of a few isolated incidents. And although some may believe that their water does not always taste great, our water supply is considered to be entirely safe for drinking.

However, as personal health awareness trends continue to grow, some folks want their water purified to a higher degree before putting it into their body. That is the reason why people are becoming more interested in having a home water filter, to remove any remaining contaminants or chemical tastes from their water.

Municipalities are coming to the stark realization that much of their aging infrastructure is requiring replacement very soon. Researchers at the University of Stamford have estimated that the federal government needs to find an almost unimaginable $3.6 trillion between now and 2020 to plough into the municipal supply network. If they don’t, they predict the contamination incidents due to failing infrastructure will only continue to get worse.

In mid-2017, USA Today ran a story that demonstrated that 1 in 5 American citizens have been exposed to unsafe drinking water due to municipal contamination issues at some point in the past decade. And the level of risk is the same whether you live in a Manhattan apartment or a Nebraska suburb.

And Then There’s That Chemical Taste...

It is easy to get carried away with the contamination stories, and the press loves it for selling newspapers, but even if we were to give the municipal supplies the benefit of the doubt, and accept that incidents of water contamination are rare, there is still the issue of taste.

Water mains are treated with chlorine and chloramines to kill off bacteria. It is carefully monitored and is well within safety limits, but it can also give your water that unpleasant chemical pool water taste.

We also have the potential for heavy metals such as aluminum and lead leaching from those 70+ year old pipe coatings into your drinking water. Flint, MI is a great example of this. Even when these heavy metals are within EPA safety limits, the continuous consumption of these can be a danger to the body.

In short, while chlorine and chloramines play a critical role in the water supply process, it is advisable to avoid it, and instead use a water filter to remove these and any other potential contaminants once the water reaches your home.

Bottled Water Is Never The Answer

Many of the concerns we’ve touched on above has led to the huge increase in bottled water sales. But, did you know that majority of bottled water is simply tap water?

Some may say it tastes better than their tap water, but this is mainly due to the fact that bottled water companies work to ensure that the taste of the disinfection products used is reduced by the time it makes it into their final bottled water product.

An even bigger concern is that bottled water carries an immense environmental impact. Millions of barrels of oil go into the creation of bottled water. And, did you know that each bottle of water requires between 1.3 - 3 bottles of water to create. (depending on the data source) The vast majority of those bottles go into a landfill and/or end up in our waterways and oceans. It’s a sad sight to see.

Our continued consumption is rapidly creating an environmental catastrophe on a global scale.

The Berkey Water Filter – Reliable, Cost Effective, Better For The Environment

When you use a home filtration system, you no longer need all those plastic bottles. So, your impact on the environment is reduced.

The average bottle of water costs around a dollar per gallon. With a Big Berkey water filter, your average cost is just a few cents per gallon. That’s more than a 95% savings. So, when you purchase a Berkey, remember that it’s a long term investment that pays for itself very quickly.

We understand why water filters are becoming increasingly popular, but why are so many households choosing Big Berkey over others on the market?

It’s because we are prepared to stand our filters alongside all the rest, showing consumers just how well the Berkey stacks up. Everyone likes transparency, so we also make all of our water testing results available for review.

There is a Berkey water filter system to suit every home and circumstance, so why not take a look at our full Berkey range to choose the ideal one for you.

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