AS HEARD ON THE GCN RADIO NETWORK! RADIO LISTENERS RECEIVE 5% OFF CERAMIC FILTER SYSTEMSAs heard on GCN! 5% off CERAMIC FILTER SYSTEMS
menuclose
Fast and Free Shipping on orders over $50!
questions? call 877-992-3753 or visit helpful resources >>

Exposure to Herbicide Evident in Pregnant Women

A study conducted on a cohort of pregnant women living in Central Indiana has detected glyphosate — the chemical toxin used in Roundup and other herbicides — in over 90% of the mothers-to-be.

In a report that was recently published in the scientific journal Environmental Health, the authors suggest that glyphosate levels are linked to shorter pregnancy terms, which can have negative lifelong impacts on the offspring.

"There is growing evidence that even a slight reduction in gestational length can lead to lifelong adverse consequences," said Shahid Parvez, assistant professor in the Department of Environmental Health Science at Indiana University and lead author of the study.

This is the first US study of its kind to analyze urine samples of pregnant women to directly assess their exposure to the chemical glyphosate.

adult-baby-background-bump-41286

According to Parvez, the study's primary finding was that of the 71 moms-to-be that made up the study cohort, 93% were found to have glyphosate at detectable levels in their urine. Glyphosate levels were higher in women living in rural areas, and in women who drank more caffeinated drinks.

While glyphosate exposure in pregnant women cannot be denied, Parvez says that the primary source of this exposure may not necessarily be drinking water, as they initially thought. None of the drinking water samples they tested had any trace of glyphosate present, indicating that glyphosate is most likely removed during the water treatment process. However, consumption of genetically modified foods, as well as caffeinated drinks are suspected of being two primary sources of glyphosate.

pregnant_woman_pregnancy_belly_mother_big_belly_waiting_baby_maternity_test-1361393

Glyphosate is used extensively in the American Midwest as a result of soybean and corn production. Residues of the herbicide can be found contaminating the environment, as well as major crops, including food items that people across the country consume daily.

"Although our study cohort was small and regional and had limited racial or ethnic diversity, it provides direct evidence of maternal glyphosate exposure and a significant correlation with shortened pregnancy," Parvez said.

Parvez notes that the extent of glyphosate exposure in mothers-to-be and the link between exposure and shorter gestation terms are cause for concern and warrant further investigation. Parvez hopes to expand this study to include more diversity, both ethnically and geographically, in the next cohort of pregnant women examined to determine whether the outcome will be the same.

To reduce the likelihood of exposure to toxic pesticides such as glyphosate, it is recommended that you filter your drinking water with a good quality drinking water filter that is capable of removing pesticide contaminants, and choose healthy organically grown fresh produce and food products wherever possible.

Journal Reference

S. Parvez, R. R. Gerona, C. Proctor, M. Friesen, J. L. Ashby, J. L. Reiter, Z. Lui, P. D. Winchester. Glyphosate exposure in pregnancy and shortened gestational length: a prospective Indiana birth cohort study. Environmental Health, 2018; 17 (1) DOI: 10.1186/s12940-018-0367-0

Leave a Reply