BIG BERKEYS OUT OF STOCK UNTIL MARCH. ROYAL BERKEYS ARE NOW ON SALE!!BIG BERKEYS OUT OF STOCK UNTIL MARCH. ROYAL BERKEYS ARE NOW ON SALE!!
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Replacement Filters

Would you like to replace you current Berkey System Filters or buy a backup set of Black Berkeys for peace of mind?  Or maybe you're interested in removing Fluoride from the water?

For Fluoride removal, please choose the lower chamber PF-2 Filters (if you currently have Black Berkeys in the upper chamber), or choose the lower chamber PF-4 Filters (if you have the New Berkey Earth Ceramic or older White Ceramic filters in the upper chamber of your Berkey).

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    • Does the Berkey Remove Chlorine and Chloramines Your Drinking Water?

      Does the Berkey remove Chlorine and Chloramines from drinking water? The short answer is Yes! The Berkey will remove chlorine to undetectable levels and chloramines over 99.9% from drinking water. But, what are the health effects of these chemicals used to treat drinking water? Many water utilities have stopped using chlorine to treat drinking water supplied to consumers, opting to use chloramine as an alternative method of disinfection instead. While chloramine is much less effective as a disinfectant, it does offer some benefits over chlorine treatment. The reason for this switch is two-fold: firstly it is cheaper and easier for utilities to use; and secondly it is more stable than chlorine, meaning that it lasts for longer and is more effective at preventing bacterial regrowth in water networks. But is this a wise decision? Let's have a closer look at some of the health effects associated with the different chemical treatment options. Treating Drinking Water with Chlorine Drinking water supplied to consumers across the country has historically been disinfected with chlorine during the treatment process. Because chlorine is extremely effective at killing bacteria and viruses, this method of treatment has virtually eradicated waterborne diseases such as cholera, dysentery and typhoid fever.Does a berkey remove chlorine and chloramines from drinking water? Yes it does!However, disinfecting drinking water with chlorine poses some health risks of its own, as not only does it kill harmful pathogens, but it can also react with chemicals commonly found in water and form new chemical compounds, or disinfection byproducts, such as trihalomethanes, which are associated with adverse health risks, including an increased risk of cancer of the bladder, colon and rectum, and possibly also breast cancer. And this risk is by no means small. The US Council of Environmental Quality estimates that people who consume chlorinated water have a 93% greater risk of getting cancer than people whose drinking water is not chlorinated. Treating Water with Chloramine By comparison, chloramine, which is an mixture of chlorine and ammonia, tends to dissipate and evaporate less readily than chlorine, making it a more stable option for treating water systems. However, studies suggest that chloramine increases the rate of deterioration of water infrastructure, degrading pipework fittings and valves. When used in conjunction with lead water pipes or fittings it can cause lead and other heavy metals to leach into the water passing through the pipes. Besides promoting the deterioration of pipes that can lead to heavy metals leaching into drinking water, like chlorine, chloramines may form harmful byproducts when they come into contact with naturally occurring organic matter, iodide or bromide during the disinfection process. But the byproducts that form may be even higher than those produced when disinfecting water with chlorine. Studies have shown that these byproducts are extremely toxic to cellular tissue in mammals, including humans, and can affect the genetic structure of cells, resulting in mutations or cancer. Other studies have shown that exposure to some byproducts, for example iodoacetic acid, can cause abnormal development in embryonic mice. According to a report by Erin Brockovich, "other byproducts resulting from the use of chloramine include the extremely toxic human carcinogens hydrazine and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA). Both of these chemicals are ingredients used in rocket fuel, and "are a result of the chloramine's combination of ammonia and chlorine, a potentially deadly cocktail," says Brockavich. According to Brockovich, when it comes to killing harmful pathogens such as rotaviruses, e-coli bacteria, and polio, chloramine is 200 times less effective compared to chlorine. Which begs the question, do the potential benefits warrant the risk? While these chemicals may offer a cheap water treatment solution, the health consequences associated with their use may be costly. As a consumer, you might not have much say over which chemical/s your utility uses to treat your drinking water or what byproducts you may be exposed to as a result of their choice. But you do have a choice when it comes to removing these unwanted nasties. A good quality home water filter, such as the Berkey range of water filters, can remove chlorine and chloramines, as well as the chemical byproducts they produce. They can also remove any pathogens that may sneak through as a result of inefficient treatment, as well as toxic metals such as lead that may leach from water pipes due to corrosion associated with treatment chemicals. Knowing that your drinking water is free from all these potentially harmful toxins will give you peace of mind that your family is drinking the purest water money can buy.

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    • Does the Berkey Remove Chlorine and Chloramines Your Drinking Water?
    • Is Drinking Recycled Sewage Water Really that Gross?

      In a move that will improve the city's water security and make it more resilient to drought, residents of El Paso, Texas, will soon be drinking recycled wastewater. According to a recent report by CNN, the city is currently constructing a closed-loop water reticulation system that will recycle and treat sewage effluent, turning it back into potable water — a process known as 'advanced purification' or 'direct potable reuse' in the water treatment industry. Recycling wastewater is not new to El Paso or other drought prone urban centers such as Scottsdale, Arizona, Orange County, California and other water-stressed utilities across the US, who currently pump treated sewage water back into aquifers where it will ultimately be used for drinking water. Once water is returned to the aquifer, "it can take about five years for the water to filter through the ground before being pumped back out and treated to the standards of clean drinking water," Gilbert Trejo, chief technical officer at El Paso Water, told CNN.Recycled sewage water safe to drink?But El Paso is now taking this one step further. Instead of returning the treated wastewater back to the aquifer, it will be filtered further before being returned to the drinking water supply network in the closed-loop system.According to Trejo, after treatment, "we see this water that's clear and it's of good quality. The next thing for us to do is to take a high-quality water we produce at a state-of-the-art facility and then treat it a little bit more with multiple treatment processes so we can drink it."According to an EPA report, the volume of wastewater generated by some large cities represents up to 60% of total volume of water supplied. This can potentially provide a huge resource to water stressed cities such as El Paso that are constantly searching for additional water sources to ensure there is sufficient supply to meet the demand. In order to ensure that recycled wastewater is clean and safe to drink, the treated effluent water undergoes several additional filtration steps, including UV and carbon filtration, to remove harmful pathogens and bacteria. In fact, water treated in this manner has been found to contain less contaminants than untreated water from a river, dam or lake. But while this may be so, treated sewage water is not widely accepted as a drinking water source, largely due to the 'gross' factor. But the fact of the matter is that anyone who lives downstream from a wastewater treatment discharge point effectively drinks treated wastewater in some form or another. Just one reason why it is wise to treat your drinking water with a good quality water purifier. For El Paso and other urban areas located in arid regions where water scarcity is a reality, water utilities do what they have to to provide their customers with a reliable source of drinking water that is safe to drink. This includes advanced purification of sewage water and desalination, which El Paso Water expects will provide 6% and 10% of the city's water supply by 2030 respectively. As the world becomes hotter and drier in future, other cities faced with water shortages as a result of increased demand and decreasing water resources may have to follow the same route.According to Trejo, "water really is all around us in every city" and we have the technology available that allows us to treat it to a very high standard to make it safe to drink.

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    • Is Drinking Recycled Sewage Water Really that Gross?
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